SIGNS OF EARLY FALL AT THE TETTEGOUCHE CLIFFS

Big Waves at the Tettegouche Cliffs

The big waves from a fall storm at the cliffs of Tettegouche State Park

EARLY FALL BRINGS CHANGES TO THE SHORE OF LAKE SUPERIOR

The first hints of fall along the lake do not happen quickly.   The huge lake moderates the cooling temperatures along the shore and the birch and aspen trees are slow to follow the changes in color that are already evident in the highlands to the north.

One sign of the approaching winter, however, is not easy to miss:   the beginning of the season for the huge storms the locals call   “Nor’easters.”   The Cliffs at Crystal Bay in Tettegouche State Park frequently catch the waves from these storms, as this photo shows.   From a vantage point along the cliffs, I often photograph the storms.   It is an invigorating experience, always cold and wet, but very exciting to watch as the 40 foot waves and the shoreline cliffs collide to put on one of nature’s greatest displays.


 

LAKE SUPERIOR FURY

Lake Superior Fury

An icy storm at the entrance to the Grand Marias harbor

LAKE SUPERIOR FURY

Taking photos during a Lake Superior storm is always challenging.  Especially in February!

The storm had been raging for some time when I found my way to the vantage point near the Grand Marias harbor entrance.   The rocks along the shore were coated with ice and footing was treacherous.   Frequent “snow-bursts” would obscure the subject and a fine mist from the breaking waves encouraged me to “get on with it.”   The photos from that day are among my favorites because they bring me back to the moment so completely and remind me again of the Fury of Lake Superior.