Also At The Cross River Gallery

Split Rock Lighthouse stands tall against the advancing fog from Lake Superior.

 

 FOGGY, FOGGY LIGHT

The thick fog, which is typical of Lake Superior, was already beginning to hide the lighthouse from view as I set up to take this photo.   Such chilling fog can roll in quickly on the big lake and is one of the reasons the lighthouse was established.

This photo is also on display at the Cross River Heritage Center Gallery during September, 2012.

SIGNS OF EARLY FALL AT THE TETTEGOUCHE CLIFFS

Big Waves at the Tettegouche Cliffs

The big waves from a fall storm at the cliffs of Tettegouche State Park

EARLY FALL BRINGS CHANGES TO THE SHORE OF LAKE SUPERIOR

The first hints of fall along the lake do not happen quickly.   The huge lake moderates the cooling temperatures along the shore and the birch and aspen trees are slow to follow the changes in color that are already evident in the highlands to the north.

One sign of the approaching winter, however, is not easy to miss:   the beginning of the season for the huge storms the locals call   “Nor’easters.”   The Cliffs at Crystal Bay in Tettegouche State Park frequently catch the waves from these storms, as this photo shows.   From a vantage point along the cliffs, I often photograph the storms.   It is an invigorating experience, always cold and wet, but very exciting to watch as the 40 foot waves and the shoreline cliffs collide to put on one of nature’s greatest displays.


 

MELT WATER AT GOOSEBERRY FALLS

Meltwater at Gooseberry Falls

Gooseberry Falls roars with the waters of early spring

The early days of spring bring a special treat to my regular visits to the rivers of the North Shore.   At Gooseberry Falls, the melting snow adds a new dimension to the spectacular falls.   The result is a photo waiting to be taken and another opportunity to enjoy a place where the land meets Lake Superior.

LAKE SUPERIOR FURY

Lake Superior Fury

An icy storm at the entrance to the Grand Marias harbor

LAKE SUPERIOR FURY

Taking photos during a Lake Superior storm is always challenging.  Especially in February!

The storm had been raging for some time when I found my way to the vantage point near the Grand Marias harbor entrance.   The rocks along the shore were coated with ice and footing was treacherous.   Frequent “snow-bursts” would obscure the subject and a fine mist from the breaking waves encouraged me to “get on with it.”   The photos from that day are among my favorites because they bring me back to the moment so completely and remind me again of the Fury of Lake Superior.

LAKE SUPERIOR NOR’EASTER

A 40 foot wave on Lake Superior

LAKE SUPERIOR NOR’EASTER

The storms on Lake Superior are Legendary and this photo shows the reason why.   On this day in October I stood on the cliffs across the river and battled the howling wind and cold spray to quickly snap a few photos before the elements got to me or the water damaged my camera.   It was early in the season for a nor’easter, but there was no doubt that the big lake was in charge that day.